Gently Rid your Garden of Snakes

Snakes are a beneficial part of our environment, but unfortunately many people see them as being scary or gross. They can actually be a friend to the organic gardener. Snakes can control some garden pests like mice, voles, slugs and beetles. But if you’re worried about venomous species or have an overwhelming phobia, there are ways to gently rid your garden of snakes. 

Gently Rid your Garden of Snakes

Remove What Attracts Them

However inconvenient, if you’re serious about keeping snakes out of your garden or yard, then you may need to clear some snake attractants. Simply remove tall grasses, shrubs, rock piles and block other places they could hide. This may sound like a lot of work, but using the proper tools can make the job easier. Anglia Tool Centre sells some great lawn tools that will make the job easier. 

Logs are a popular resting place for snakes, but if you’re using them for your wood burning stove, you can’t get rid of those. Instead, you could build a log storage using 3 frames of small scale wire mesh with a solid roof, then add a mesh gate at the front. The holes would need to be less than 0.5cm/0.25in. The mesh should allow enough air circulation to keep the logs dry.

If you have a pond with lots of frogs, or a thriving mice population, then snakes will be very keen to snack on those. If possible, use humane traps to relocate them a good distance away from your property.

Snake-proof Fence

Garden Fence

This is the most labour-intensive and costly method for keeping snakes out but you may feel it’s worth it. The fence needs to reach at least six inches below the soil level and slant outward at a 30° angle. Using a heavy, galvanised hardware cloth with quarter inch mesh between posts, should keep these reptiles at bay. This is a long-term solution and completely humane.

Funnel Traps

You can buy these or make them yourself from hardware cloth. Make a cylinder and close one end. Form another piece of cloth into a funnel and insert into the cylinder. If you put a box inside the trap, snakes will often curl up inside, instead of trying to find a way out. Snakes, whether venomous or not, can bite when threatened, so require careful handling. If you are not experienced in dealing with snakes, contact the relevant authority in your area.

Essential Oils

The US Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services apparently relies entirely on natural oils to repel snakes. They found oils made from cinnamon, clove and eugenol to be the most effective. They produced some useful notes on how to use the repellent.

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Whether you see snakes as garden helper or the stuff of nightmares, remember to proceed with extreme caution if you encounter one. Most snakes are pretty docile if left alone. They’re beautiful and beneficial if you allow them to live peacefully in your garden. 🙂 But if you’re too frightened, simply follow our easy guidelines to Gently Rid your Garden of Snakes. Be kind. 

*Image Credits: Path Walk In Garden Image courtesy of Keerati at FreeDigitalPhotos.net; Garden Sign Image courtesy of Simon Howden at FreeDigitalPhotos.net; Green Snake Image courtesy of PANPOTE at FreeDigitalPhotos.net; Green Snake Image courtesy of tiverylucky at FreeDigitalPhotos.net


 

Nicole

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Nicole is the owner, primary blogger and copy editor of Organic Sunshine. She has a passion for healthy, natural living and hopes to encourage others to live a similar lifestyle. Nicole has a bachelor's degree in Healthcare Administration and over 10 years of experience working in Cancer Research. She's also an experienced content writer, producing high quality articles on a variety of topics for many online publications.

Author: Nicole

Nicole is the owner, primary blogger and copy editor of Organic Sunshine. She has a passion for healthy, natural living and hopes to encourage others to live a similar lifestyle. Nicole has a bachelor's degree in Healthcare Administration and over 10 years of experience working in Cancer Research. She's also an experienced content writer, producing high quality articles on a variety of topics for many online publications.

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10 Comments

  1. Great ideas! We have really long black snakes here (not sure exactly what type) and I catch them all the time in deer netting! It seems like anywhere I use it, a snake tries to crawl through and gets stuck. Thankfully their nonvenomous and I just untangle them and take them for a ride down the street a bit. That green snake is very pretty!

    Thanks for linking up with Green Thumb Thursday! I hope you’ll join us again this week!

    ~Lisa

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    • We have those black snakes too. I think ours are garter snakes. They don’t bother me and I tell the kids to just stay away from them and they won’t be bothered. Thanks for stopping by and commenting!

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  2. Glad to see humane tricks in here. Too many people resort to poison which is a shame. I’ll admit, snakes are a bit creepy but they do help the environment.

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    • So true Kelsey! I don’t mind snakes in our yard, but I know they stress some people out. There are non harmful ways to rid them from your garden. Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

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  3. Great humane tricks here. We have garden, blow, and rattlesnakes here. I love that they keep the gopher and bug population down here, but sure hate finding them 🙂 .

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    • Thanks so much Deborah. I would prefer to gently remove them without harming them myself. Especially since you have dangerous snakes in your area. But they certainly are beneficial! 🙂

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  4. Thanks again for joining us for Green Thumb Thursday. Your post was chosen as the featured post of the week. Stop by the blog and grab a featured badge!

    I hope to see you again this week!

    Lisa

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  5. Hi! Sadly we had 3 black rat snakes that became hopelessly entangled in mesh deer netting. 2 died, despite our efforts to save them. It seems they died of exposure before we got to them. The 3rd, we cut out of the mesh netting and saved. We tore the netting down immediately, so our garden while likely be eaten by bunnies and deer, but we just couldn’t stand the thought of another snake dying due to our efforts to protect a garden. Do you know of any deer/rabbit fences that are snake safe!??!?!? Thanks for being reptile friendly! They get a bad rap, but most are gentle and non-venomous and just want to avoid confrontation.

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    • Hi Jennifer. I’m so sorry to hear about the snakes getting caught in the netting. 🙁 My husband recently bought a pvc pickett fence to protect our garden. It keeps the critters out, but is big enough for the snakes to fit through. I hope this helps.

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