Home Aquaponic System

Setting up a home aquaponic system can be easy. In this article I will give you easy, step-by-step instructions for what materials you will need to set up your very own Aquaponic system. Don’t be intimidated, anyone can do it!!

I will get you started with a simple list of materials you should purchase to begin building your very own home aquaponic system. These supplies should be easy to find and inexpensive too! You can also watch instructional videos on this topic to learn more. Learn More at Aquaponics 4 You. 

Here’s what you need to get started: The home aquaponic system basics

  • Fish tank
  • Grow Bed
  • Grow Bed Support
  • Water Pump
  • Pipework and fittings

 Supply Details

Here’s a little more detail about the supplies you need.

Fish Tank

The best option for a fish tank in a DIY aquaponics system is a stock tank/water trough, which you can get from animal feed/agricultural suppliers. Stock tanks can be used as is, with no modification required and they look more attractive than other options.

The fish tank should have the same volume as the grow bed, ie. a 1:1 ratio. The tank should be relatively low and wide so there is plenty of surface area in relation to volume for better exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide..

Opaque containers are best, if you choose one that’s not opaque algae may be a problem.

Grow Bed

The best option is a hydroponic flood tray, which you can get from hydroponics suppliers. They only require minor modifications in order to install fittings. A depth of 12? is best because it allows you to grow the widest variety of vegetables.

Pump

The best type of pump is a magnetic drive pump because it has less moving parts, and there are no seals to wear out. The pump should have a sufficient flow rate to circulate the entire volume of the fish tank at least once an hour.

Auto Siphon

An auto siphon controls the flooding and draining of the grow bed.

Plumbing Components

Pipework:

  • drain – 1″ PVC pipe
  • water inlet – either flexible tubing or rigid PVC pipe, 1/2″ diameter or greater.

Fittings:

  • drain – 2 elbows and 1 bulkhead
  • water inlet – bulkhead and valve/tap

You can get all of the above from a hardware store, hydroponics store or pond equipment supplier. The process is easiest when you follow along on a DIY video while setting-up the system.  Once you’ve purchased all the materials mentioned above, you are ready to begin setting up the system. Visit Aquaponics 4 You to learn more.

home aquaponics system

Aquaponics 4 You

 

Nicole

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Nicole is the owner, primary blogger and copy editor of Organic Sunshine. She has a passion for healthy, natural living and hopes to encourage others to live a similar lifestyle. Nicole has a bachelor's degree in Healthcare Administration and over 10 years of experience working in Cancer Research. She's also an experienced content writer, producing high quality articles on a variety of topics for many online publications.

Author: Nicole

Nicole is the owner, primary blogger and copy editor of Organic Sunshine. She has a passion for healthy, natural living and hopes to encourage others to live a similar lifestyle. Nicole has a bachelor's degree in Healthcare Administration and over 10 years of experience working in Cancer Research. She's also an experienced content writer, producing high quality articles on a variety of topics for many online publications.

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8 Comments

    • Here are a few easy growing aquaponic plants:
      • Cabbage
      • Cauliflower
      • Broccoli
      • Carrots
      • Beetroot
      • Lettuce
      • Cucumber
      • Red Onion
      • Tomato
      • Herbs (parsley, basil, sage, lemongrass, oregano)
      Aside from the produce & herbs listed above, there are many other types of fruit and vegetables you can grow. The most important thing is that the plants require a neutral Ph.

      The bed type will be determined by the root structure of the plant. Plants with no root structure need floating beds, while root vegetables grow better in wicking beds. Most everything else grows well in media beds. For plants like lettuce, herbs or leafy greens, floating “raft” style beds are ideal. For root vegetables, wicking beds are a better choice. If you choose to grow tomatoes, peppers, beans or other types of multi-yield plants, media beds are probably your best option.

      Hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

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  1. Thanks a lot for this information because I need this. I have a large area and I want to do business in the aquaponic field because in my area the veggies are hard to get so I am thinking to start a business and help my country people. I’ll keep these tips in my mind and I think with veggies I can do business in fishing area. Thank you so much..

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  2. I’m glad to read this post. Here you shared a good information which is useful for me because I’m planning to plant some veggies in my garden. Cabbage, Carrots, Tomato and oninons are in my mind. I’ll keep your tips in my mind. Thanks a lot for sharing and keep up blogging….

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    • Thanks so much! I’m glad you found the article helpful! 🙂

      Post a Reply
  3. Great article, aquaponics is such an amazing thing to get into! You make the start up costs back in a year and have amazing, great tasting & organic food to eat!

    Post a Reply

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